Drumming is an excellent way for children to learn self-awareness, listening skills, coordination of breath and movement, cooperation and patience.

Schools that encourage recreational music programs find those activities very useful for social development. From an evolutionary prospective, the smarter the animal the more they play. For humans, play drums in a guided drum circle reinvigorates us not because it is down time, but because it gets us in touch with our core selves and the joy for life. Evidence based research and studies demonstrate that group drumming activities enchance positive social skills, promotes respect and diversity for peers and their ideas resulting in making better life choices. Through the lens of play research, we can see that there is a direct line between music-arts deficiencies and some frightening public health and social trends: Obesity-attention deficit hyperactive disorder-increase in childhood and adult depression- Classroom behavioral problems and an inability to interact well with peers.

At the heart of the matter, music is not meant to be competitive. Drum circles provide the platform for social connection, wellness and unity for all participants.

It’s not about drumming skill and competency .
It’s more about social connection, wellness and mindful creative expression.

You may ask, “What does this have to do with playing drums?”

Here are just a few positive benefits that drumming contribute to PLAY:

-Ability to focus inward as well as outward
-Develop self-awareness and self-esteem
-Mastery of breath and movement
-Ability to stay “on task”
-Improve listening skills
-Increase Frustration Tolerance
-Embrace cultural diversity
-Channel aggressive/destructive impulses into a creative and positive activity
-Develop self-control, patience and cooperation
-Leadership awareness
-Appreciation of the Musical Arts
-Social engagement/Teamwork
-Respect for peers

“Freedom Drum Circles, brings patience, compassion and rhythmical fun to all the schools and students”